Attorney Search
Site Search


For all media inquiries, please contact:
Kate Fairweather
+44 20 7710 9842

For U.S. media inquiries, please contact:
Jack Pettit
+1 212 696 6920

Email Page Print Friendly Page Share


January 1, 2012
Premier International Trade Group Joins Curtis

Washington, December 15, 2011 - Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle LLP has announced the addition of a premier international trade group, including four partners, to its Washington, D.C. office, effective January 1.

Joining Curtis are partners William H. Barringer, Daniel L. Porter, James P. Durling, and Christopher A. Dunn; counsel Matthew P. McCullough; associates Ross E. Bidlingmaier and Yu Li; and trade analysts Michael Ferrier, Anya Naschak and Jonathan Leeman.

Most recently at Winston & Strawn LLP, the group is particularly noted for its work in trade remedies cases and WTO litigation, Including antidumping, countervailing duty, and safeguard investigations.  Their extensive WTO experience includes counseling both governments and corporations in disputes, negotiations and various bilateral and regional trade issues.

Each of the four partners has earned recognition from Chambers and other legal industry directories as leaders in their field.

"The fit here was immediately obvious to both the group and us," said George Kahale III, Chairman of Curtis.  "We have a longstanding reputation as an elite international firm, and this is an elite international practice group that shares our outlook on the practice. We are excited about the possibilities this move offers for expanding the services we provide to our international clientele."

"For us, the key was Curtis' international reputation, orientation and vision," said Mr. Barringer.  "We are excited to be joining a firm with such a strong international platform."

William Barringer, the most senior member of the team, has been a preeminent trade lawyer for decades.  He has been involved in some of the most significant international trade disputes of the last quarter-century.  He frequently leads multidisciplinary teams to tackle complex and contentious trade disputes.  He earned his J.D. and L.L.M. from Georgetown University Law Center and his A.B. in economics from Brown University.

Daniel Porter has played a leading role in the group's trade remedy work, expanding its work to represent numerous Chinese and other foreign companies in trade remedy proceedings.  He has also been active providing advice to companies confronting trade regulatory issues on their imports.  Mr. Porter received his J.D. from Cornell Law School and his B.A. in Political Science from Columbia University.

James Durling, in addition to his work on trade remedy cases, has been active in several WTO disputes across a range of issues.  He also advises companies making submissions to CFIUS, and confronting international trade regulatory issues in their cross border M&A transactions.  Mr. Durling graduated from New York University School of Law and Haverford College.

Christopher Dunn has also played an active role in the group's trade remedy work, focusing more on Brazil and Latin America.  He has additionally worked with many companies on customs regulatory issues.  Mr. Dunn earned his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and his A.B. in International Business from Brown University.

Matthew McCullough, in addition to assisting on all aspects of trade remedy work, provides experience with customs matters, issues related to export controls, anti-boycott regulations, and the U.S. sanctions regime.  Mr. McCullough received his J.D. from Catholic University Columbus School of Law and his B.A. from Austin College.

Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle LLP is a leading international law firm providing a broad range or services to clients around the world.  Curtis has offices in the United States, Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East and Latin America.  The firm's international orientation has been a hallmark of its practice for nearly two centuries.  For more information about Curtis, please visit or follow Curtis on Twitter ( and 
International Lawyers