What is the Court of Arbitration called?

The Court of Arbitration, more fully known as the Permanent Court of Arbitration, is often referred to as the PCA. With its headquarters in the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, the PCA is an arbitral tribunal and alternative dispute resolution (ADR) organization dedicated to providing affordable dispute resolution services to international parties from around the world.

What does the Permanent Court of Arbitration do?

The Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) handles alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and fact-finding/inquiry-based services for a wide array of international actors. Headquartered in the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, the PCA offers arbitral tribunals, administrative support, and even financial assistance for those seeking ADR services around the world.

What does PCA stand for in law?

PCA stands for the Permanent Court of Arbitration. It is an intergovernmental institution that offers alternative dispute resolution services to the wider international community. Permanent Court of Arbitration rules allow the PCA to offer mediation and conciliation services, as well as fact-finding and inquiry-based proceedings.

What is the ruling of the Permanent Court of Arbitration?

The rulings of the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) can be found on their website. The PCA currently sits on 3 interstate proceedings, 52 cases under contracts or agreements involving a state or public organization, and 109 investor-state arbitrations. The PCA has previously issued binding rulings in countless other cases involving private and public actors in a variety of settings.